Hot Weather, Heat Stroke and Keeping Your Pup Safe

Hot Weather, Heat Stroke and Keeping Your Pup Safe

Posted by Emily on Jul 21st 2019

Heat stroke happens to your pup when they are unable to keep their body temperatures at a normal level. To keep cool your pup pants to regulate their internal temperatures. Knowing the signs of heat stroke and what to do can help save your pup before its too late! 

Signs of heat stroke include vomiting, pale gums, excessive panting, drooling, diarrhea, lethargy and confusion. It's always good to know how your pet tolerates heat. It's also good to know older dogs can overheat more easily. Always avoid leaving your pup in a warm car or taking long walks on warmer days. 

Overheating takes a toll on the body and can lead to death if your pup is not cooled down. When the body begins to overheat irreversible damage can be done to the liver, kidneys, heart and brain. 

So what do you do when you think you have an overheating dog? 

1.) Find cool cover for your pup! Shade or a cool building to get away from the direct sun and hot ground is the best first move when your pup is too hot. 

2.) Use cool water to reduce the effects of heat. If your pup is having a heat stroke you do not want to cool them down too fast! Cooling your pup down too fast can cause health issues and shock their bodies- do not dunk them in water! You can use a washcloth soaked in cold water and apply it to their feet, belly and inner thighs.

3.) Use cool water (not ice cold) to bring your pups body temperature back to normal. Gently pour the cool water on your pup and allow the water to evaporate (evaporation will aid in cooling your dog down).

4.) Offer your pup water but in small amount and only after you have cooled them down. 

As soon as your pup is cool take them to a vet. Damage from heat stoke can last days so checking with your vet is key. Keep your pups safe this summer and remember that sometimes it's best to leave fido at home where he can keep cool.             




Credit:

https://www.dogsnaturallymagazine.com/heat-stroke-and-your-dog/